Posts Tagged ‘koreanism’

So, what is an asian blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery)?

May 8, 2004

Some sample before and after photos of the grotesquery known as asian cosmetic eyelid surgery can be found here. The procedure has to be performed under general anesthesia (they put you to sleep since they have to slice into your eyelids, obviously). I can remember vomiting during the drive back due to the effects of the anesthesia (I wasn’t driving). I had to go back to the “doctor’s” office a week later to have the stitches removed. [after a week of jury duty] And then I had to endure the wacked compliments of UBF members telling me how much “better” I looked. I had looked just fine the way I was, thank you; It’s called self confidence, good self esteem. One of the first things UBF teaches you is Genesis 1:31, “Then God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good.” But they could force me and many others into such a petty and unnecessary thing as eyelid surgery because, apparently, what God saw as very good wasn’t good enough for Samuel Lee.

I remember that Samuel Lee’s youngest daughter was among the first to get eyelid surgery done. I remember the excuse given for her undergoing this petty and unnecessary procedure: Her eyelashes were bothering her eyes.

Update: More excerpts from “Utter Biblestudying Futility”:

– Koreans are apt to notice my double eyelids. These are apparently a desirable physical trait to them. Probably millions of Korean women have undergone cosmetic surgery to get them. How weird and stupid. What they don’t know is how I, a Korean male, got this “desirable physical trait.” It was Samuel Lee’s idea one day to give me double eyelids. And my parents didn’t leave me alone until I “obeyed his direction,” even if it meant that they would be paying for this expensive, unnecessary and stupid surgery (with virtually no income as a grad student, I certainly wasn’t going to pay for it). I gave in to them (and in effect, to Samuel Lee) out of a misplaced desire to be a good son. On the day of the surgery in Northwest Indiana, my mother and David Choi drove me to the doctor’s office. I don’t know if my mother was capable of driving on the expressway at that time or not, but I suspect that David Choi’s presence served a double purpose: 1) To drive us out there to the doctor’s office and 2) to make sure I obeyed “God’s servant’s direction” in case I got cold feet at the last second. I was (and continue to be) ticked off about this absurdity, this “mark of the beast” etched on my eyelids, this sign that Samuel Lee’s control of UBF members’ lives extended even to their bodies. (Ask me about the circumcisions and abortions he ordered.) When I expressed my displeasure to my mother, she would say that I looked “better.” She would even go so far as to say that my “new and improved” look would improve my job prospects, as if any American employer would even notice or pay attention to double eyelids. I can say without a doubt that obtaining a Ph.D. and two jobs after that were not helped in any way by these stupid double eyelids. My parents can’t understand what an affront this surgery was to my life, these parents who were taught from the beginnings of their involvement in UBF that “God saw all that he had made, and it was very good.”